Daniel Reetz, the founder of the DIY Book Scanner community, has recently started making videos of prototyping and shop tips. If you are tinkering with a book scanner (or any other project) in your home shop, these tips will come in handy. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCn0gq8 ... g_8K1nfInQ

[the archivist] DIY inserts for the tubes

Share your process here - how to build something, scan something, or use something.
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Corentin
Posts: 6
Joined: 08 Oct 2015, 05:37
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Country: Belgium

[the archivist] DIY inserts for the tubes

Post by Corentin » 11 Jul 2016, 10:38

I'm building the archivist book scanner and I designed 3D-printing inserts for the tubes. The piece is quite simple, and it works well. I've just printed one insert yesterday for testing, the others will come in a few days.
IMG_0824.jpg
diy insert (note that the bolt may be shorter)
IMG_0824.jpg (41.85 KiB) Viewed 1405 times
I will put more infos here when all the pieces will be done…

duerig
Posts: 343
Joined: 01 Jun 2014, 17:04
Number of books owned: 1000
Country: United States of America

Re: [the archivist] DIY inserts for the tubes

Post by duerig » 12 Jul 2016, 12:29

Corentin, this will be very useful. Before I switched to making the Quill, my source for these tube insertion nuts had a minimum order of 1000 units. Which means that this is one of the hardest to source parts if you want to just make a single Archivist for yourself.

I'm not sure if I see yet how it all comes together. Once you have it all working and post some pictures, hopefully that will become more clear. After you post the rest of the information here, I can add a link to Daniel's Archivist design guide so that others can make their own inserts as well.

-D

Corentin
Posts: 6
Joined: 08 Oct 2015, 05:37
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Country: Belgium

Re: [the archivist] DIY inserts for the tubes

Post by Corentin » 12 Jul 2016, 17:35

duerig wrote:Corentin, this will be very useful. Before I switched to making the Quill, my source for these tube insertion nuts had a minimum order of 1000 units. Which means that this is one of the hardest to source parts if you want to just make a single Archivist for yourself.
That was exactly my case, 3D-printing the pieces is the only solution for me…
duerig wrote:I'm not sure if I see yet how it all comes together. Once you have it all working and post some pictures, hopefully that will become more clear.
The principe is simple, when you tighten the bolt, the two extreme parts get closer so that the two middle parts apply a pressure on the tube. There is a short video :
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aIvn7I78XME (note that the bolt can be shorter)

I can't go further for the moment. The fablab's printer is down :x . The next pieces will come as soon as possible (with all the documentation.)

duerig
Posts: 343
Joined: 01 Jun 2014, 17:04
Number of books owned: 1000
Country: United States of America

Re: [the archivist] DIY inserts for the tubes

Post by duerig » 12 Jul 2016, 19:51

This looks great. I suppose you just have to tweak the shape a bit to fit within the round handlebar. I love the ingenious use of a 3d printer.

I will keep an eye out for when you post the final design files. Hopefully the fablab's printer will come up soon. :)

-D

Corentin
Posts: 6
Joined: 08 Oct 2015, 05:37
Number of books owned: 0
Country: Belgium

Re: [the archivist] DIY inserts for the tubes

Post by Corentin » 18 Jul 2016, 07:21

I found an other place to print my pieces and they work fine. Thus, I give more details…

The design

Each connector comprises :
- one bolt (I use a M6-10mm furniture bolt but 70mm is enought)
- one M6 nut
- four 3D-printing pieces : two « fixed pieces » and two « sliding pieces ». There is a snick for the nut in one of the two fixed pieces.
tof 1.jpg
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The principle is simple : tighten the bolt, the two fixed parts get closer so that the two sliding parts apply a pressure on the tube.

When I designed my pieces, I tried to adapt the measures to have tolerance between the different pieces. I can not say I succeded. The holes for the bolts are too tight and the printed parts can be a little bigger. This also vary depending on the 3D-printer. Despite this fail, the connectors are strong and work well. I didn't have to redesign it.

The printing

Since there are compressive forces on the pieces, I think that the thickness is an important parameter. I put 2mm and I don't have fissure or deformation after the use.
Likewise, the filament diametre may not be too big so thath the parts can slide easily.
I think that the others parameters are less important. Again, the result may differ with the printer. It's better to print one prototype before printing all the connectors.

For all the printinng parts (10 connectors = 40 pieces), I used 174g of PLA and paid about 14€.
tof 2.png
Results

- First point, this works well ! Even it is not perfect, I don't need to re-design or re-print something : my bookscanner is strong 8-)
- This system create lot of pressure on the wood part, I had to add one washer to each connection.
- The insert for the cylindric tube have one problem : sometimes the 4 pieces rotate when I tighten the bolt (in french « ça tourne fou »). With a bit of practice, I was abble to tighten correctly the insert. I suppose that you can also fix that with a bit of glue between the wood and the insert first piece.
- As I said, the tolerance between the parts is mishandled.
- I think taht the design must evolve toward less pieces by insert.
tof 3.jpg
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tof 4.jpg
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tof 5.jpg
tof 5.jpg (66.61 KiB) Viewed 1269 times
tof 6.jpg
tof 6.jpg (65.67 KiB) Viewed 1269 times
tof 7.jpg
tof 7.jpg (81.16 KiB) Viewed 1269 times
I re-link the video : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aIvn7I78XME

I din't find a sentence to end this post. Voilà

dpc
Posts: 259
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Location: Issaquah, WA

Re: [the archivist] DIY inserts for the tubes

Post by dpc » 20 Jul 2016, 12:06

There are a number of ways to solve this fastening problem.

A simple way is to use a threaded rod and put rod coupling nuts on each end so that female threads are exposed on the ends of the rod allowing you to still use bolts to hold the tube to the sides.

Thought if I were doing this, I'd use a piece of aluminum rod and thread the just the ends of it for lighter weight. I'd also cut some small wood blocks and drill a through hole for the rod to go through inside of the square tubing. This would ensure the rod stays centered in the tubing when trying to start the bolts.

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