On January 17th, 2017, we migrated the community forum to a new hosting provider. If you posted, sent a private message, or applied for board membership between January 10th, 2017 and January 17th 2017, your submission might have been lost. We are currently working on recovering data from this time period. We are also working on getting the theme of the forum back to normal.

If you notice any new issues or have any questions, please contact duerig at jonathonduerig dot com for more assistance. Thanks for your patience.

Original ~600pg/hr, very portable scanner now achieving ~900pg-1100pg/hr

Built a scanner? Started to build a scanner? Record your progress here. Doesn't need to be a whole scanner - triggers and other parts are fine. Commercial scanners are fine too.
Post Reply
Mohib
Posts: 26
Joined: 05 Apr 2014, 21:15
Number of books owned: 0
Country: Canada

Original ~600pg/hr, very portable scanner now achieving ~900pg-1100pg/hr

Post by Mohib » 19 Mar 2017, 20:45

3 years ago I posted details and plans about my portable, easy to build, single page scanner here:

viewtopic.php?f=14&t=3007

The trigger mechanism in that original version was Daniel Reetz' brilliant idea to use a bike break. Although it worked perfectly, the big problem was all the hardware around the camera, which would have to be custom designed for each camera.

David Landin suggested using an infra-red trigger. As I mentioned I hadn't thought about it because I was trying to make the system work with simple mechanical cameras that people had, rather than having to buy a special camera that had that feature (and also the trigger). However I did note it would simplify the construction a lot.

Well I got busy so was not able to work on some ideas I had for simplifying the scanner construction, one of which was not to use a dedicated camera, but an iPhone (or similar) and a Bluetooth trigger. This would effectively provide the same benefits of the David's infra-red trigger (i.e. wireless and no construction needed) but at a fraction of the cost since a special camera would not be needed.

I have finally been able to test the idea out and it worked spectacularly. One of the problems with my old camera, was it did not have a focus lock, so you had to wait for it to focus on each shot. I had speculated in my original post that, if the focusing could be eliminated, I could probably speed up the ~600 page/hour scanning rate by about 50%. Well that is exactly what happened and I'm now getting rates of 900-1100 pages per hour.

Attached below are some screenshots showing the files for 1 min of scanning (as recorded by the time stamps, which match my measurements via a stop watch while scanning) and I'm getting 16-18 pages per min, or about 960-1080 pages per hour) and it doesn't drop as much as it used to with the regular camera as the scanner as there's less fiddling with the iPhone.

I'm using an iPhone 4s with the "Camera+ Free" app (with the 5-in-1 Superbundle purchase of $2.99):
https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/camera- ... 16489?mt=8

The reason I chose this software is:

a) It has high resolution files because without it the quality is too degraded for good OCR. It offers high quality JPEG or TIF; I use JPEG as TIF is very large and seems a cause the app to crash after a few saves.

b) It has full manual controls -- white balance, shutter and ISO. ISO is particularly important and I set it at 50 to reduce grain and keep image quality up.

c) It has focus lock.

d) It works with bluetooth triggers. Apparently not all iPhone camera software does -- the key to ensuring bluetooth works, seems to be ensuring the volume controls can be used a shutter release.

For my blue tooth trigger I bought this from Amazon ($5-$7.50 depending on the day):
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0113W600M

And to hold the iPhone I got this smart phone tripod adapter from Amazon ($8.00). I chose it because it doesn't use springs to hold the phone, but instead has a solid thumbscrew/clamp to hold the smart phone:
https://www.amazon.com/Vastar-Universal ... 01L3B5PBI/

Below are some pics of the updated scanner set up and you can see the trigger zip-tied to the white platen handle and effortless to use with your thumb. Notice also the platen is no longer connected to the camera support by cable which makes it much easier to move out of the way and deal with it.
7x7 v1.5 - using iPhone 4s - closeup - small.jpg
7x7 v1.5 - using iPhone 4s - closeup - small.jpg (285.96 KiB) Viewed 122 times
7x7 v1.5 - using iPhone 4s - full scanner & bluetooth trigger - small.jpg
7x7 v1.5 - using iPhone 4s - full scanner & bluetooth trigger - small.jpg (318.15 KiB) Viewed 122 times
2017.03.19.a - 7x7 using iPhone 4s - first speed test - 16 pp-per-min = 960pp-per-hour.png
2017.03.19.a - 7x7 using iPhone 4s - first speed test - 16 pp-per-min = 960pp-per-hour.png (28.8 KiB) Viewed 122 times
2017.03.19.b - 7x7 using iPhone 4s - first speed test - 16 pp-per-min = 960pp-per-hour.png
2017.03.19.b - 7x7 using iPhone 4s - first speed test - 16 pp-per-min = 960pp-per-hour.png (28.68 KiB) Viewed 122 times
2017.03.19.c - 7x7 using iPhone 4s - first speed test - 18 pp-per-min = 1080pp-per-hour.png
2017.03.19.c - 7x7 using iPhone 4s - first speed test - 18 pp-per-min = 1080pp-per-hour.png (29.43 KiB) Viewed 122 times
Last edited by Mohib on 20 Mar 2017, 02:51, edited 5 times in total.

Mohib
Posts: 26
Joined: 05 Apr 2014, 21:15
Number of books owned: 0
Country: Canada

Re: Original ~600pg/hr, very portable scanner now achieving ~900pg-1100pg/hr

Post by Mohib » 19 Mar 2017, 23:53

For reference attached is a sample page (at 50% size for posting here) from the iPhone 4s and camera software set as above.

a) original image (still a bit grainy but the iPhone 4s camera is a 6 year old camera now so new cameras should be much better). Also I was under exposing 1 stop to make the make the text denser for better OCR, but I'm not sure it helped as both under and regular exposures had the same quality OCR (see OCR below).

b) Scan Tailor output (brilliant as usual).

c) OCR by Abbyy FineReader below:

showy but deeper and more durable satisfactions,
according to Sleeper, can be found in many locales and
many different kinds of activities, but "to an extent surely
underestimated by the more cosmopolitan among us, New
lorkers of all ages find them at least partly in neighborhoods,
at the local parish hall or synagogue, and in the
nearby tavern, diner, community center or park "
Informal meeting places, which sustain the life of neighborhoods,
arc also the subject of a lively book by Ray Oldenburg,
The Great Good Place: Cafes, Coffee Shops, Community
Centers, Beauty Parlors, General Stores, Bars, Hangouts and
How They Get You through the Day An important attraction
of informal hangouts—"third places," as Oldenburg calls
them in order to distinguish them from large, highly structured
organizations, on the one hand, and from families and
other small groups, on the other—is the fact that "w hatcver
hint of a hierarchy exists is predicated upon human
decency" and not on wealth, glamour, aggression, or even
intelligence. Reminding us of the Roman proverb that
"nothing is more annoying than a low man raised to a high
place," Oldenburg contrasts the informal society found in
neighborhood hangouts with the hierarchy of the workplace,
where Roman wisdom is not much in evidence. In
the "great good place," on the other hand, "right prevails."
It is an "invariable" rule, in Oldenburg's experience, that
"the cream rises." Moreover, it spills over into the neighborhood
as a whole; habits of decency acquired in the informal
society of their peers arc not forgotten w hen the
regulars leave their favorite haunts.
Promotion of decency in the third place is not limited to
it. The regulars are not likely to do any of those things
roundly disapproved at the coffee counter Many items
of proper and improper behavior are reviewed in the
Revolt  of the Elites - 131 - 50%.jpg
Revolt  of the Elites - 131 - 50% (TIFF as JPG).jpg

Mohib
Posts: 26
Joined: 05 Apr 2014, 21:15
Number of books owned: 0
Country: Canada

Re: Original ~600pg/hr, very portable scanner now achieving ~900pg-1100pg/hr

Post by Mohib » Today, 03:56

Just did my first real scan test of a hard cover book (right hand pages):

122 pages in 8.2 mins (start to finish, all in) (time stamps attached)
= 14.9 pages/min
= 892 pages/hour

That 8.2 mins includes twice pausing scanning to adjust the macro focus bar a few mm down (per the reasons given in my original post for the scanner).

Needless to say I'm impressed given this is a single camera scanner.

I'm also testing some mods that dramatically simplify the construction. I'll know tomorrow if they all work (1 does for sure) and will post details shortly.
122 pages in 8.2 mins - part 1.jpg
122 pages in 8.2 mins - part 1.jpg (497.4 KiB) Viewed 2 times
122 pages in 8.2 mins - part 2.jpg
122 pages in 8.2 mins - part 2.jpg (496.44 KiB) Viewed 2 times
122 pages in 8.2 mins - part 3.jpg
122 pages in 8.2 mins - part 3.jpg (503.23 KiB) Viewed 2 times

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest