Daniel Reetz, the founder of the DIY Book Scanner community, has recently started making videos of prototyping and shop tips. If you are tinkering with a book scanner (or any other project) in your home shop, these tips will come in handy. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCn0gq8 ... g_8K1nfInQ

A DIY Book Scanner In Every Hackerspace /DIY Kit

Built a scanner? Started to build a scanner? Record your progress here. Doesn't need to be a whole scanner - triggers and other parts are fine. Commercial scanners are fine too.
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daniel_reetz
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Engineering challenge... Pivoting, self-adjusting spine supp

Post by daniel_reetz » 08 Oct 2011, 18:12

BTW, there is one other problem with this system that needs some engineering effort. It will work fine as it is, but eventually we need to solve this thing. I'm going to update this post with this design challenge soon, and provide images, but for now I am going to try to explain it primarily with text since I am posting from a phone.

On the cradle, the area where the spine of the book rests is flat. On this design, there is a 1/2" channel to accept a dowel. The idea of the dowel is to support the spine of the book as it curves up from being open. This works fine when you are in the middle of the book.

However, on thick books, the thickness of the curving stack of pages changes the inside angle of the book with respect to the platen. The end result is that the book does not perfectly self-center. When you are at the left or right extreme of the book, the off-centered-ness can be up to 1/4", which is detrimental to the overall scan quality.

Right now, this can be fixed by installing toolbox liner and pulling on the sides of it to rotate the spine of the book slightly in either direction as the scan proceeds from the left to the right of the book.

Mechanically speaking, the solution is a spine support that can rotate the spine a few degrees right and left from the central pivot point of the spine, longitudinally along it, like a super-wide teeter-totter. Maybe some skate-bearing thing can be cooked up... it is only necessary for larger books, so I'm realizing as I write this that it's entirely possible to have it be a drop-in-insert.

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Re: A DIY Book Scanner In Every Hackerspace /DIY Kit

Post by vitorio » 08 Oct 2011, 18:23

How long does the current 4'x8' pattern take to cut?

The local workshop with a Shopbot that large is $75/hr. runtime plus $100/hr. setup and tooling, so of course I'd prefer to minimize that. They expect to code up the plans themselves (I have no CNC experience) so I'd want them to incorporate any changes made up to that point, and then I'd work with them to re-release them or further optimize them. I don't know anyone else in town interested in having one of their own, but the local hackerspace will take one, I think.

Has anyone made an itemized parts list yet?

GaryK

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Post by GaryK » 08 Oct 2011, 18:36

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Last edited by GaryK on 17 Dec 2011, 14:48, edited 1 time in total.

fitterman

Re: A DIY Book Scanner In Every Hackerspace /DIY Kit

Post by fitterman » 08 Oct 2011, 18:50

@vitorio, you raise an interesting point. There are probably going to be lots of people who might benefit from sharing setup charges if they could pool their purchase with others in their area. I have no idea where you are — which I guess is part of this problem. I'd be interested in pooling with someone once a few of the earliest kinks are worked out. I'm in the NYC metro area.
vitorio wrote:How long does the current 4'x8' pattern take to cut?

The local workshop with a Shopbot that large is $75/hr. runtime plus $100/hr. setup and tooling, so of course I'd prefer to minimize that. They expect to code up the plans themselves (I have no CNC experience) so I'd want them to incorporate any changes made up to that point, and then I'd work with them to re-release them or further optimize them. I don't know anyone else in town interested in having one of their own, but the local hackerspace will take one, I think.

fitterman

Re: A DIY Book Scanner In Every Hackerspace /DIY Kit

Post by fitterman » 08 Oct 2011, 19:00

In the video, Daniel talks about the need to have the scanner perfectly level in order for the cradle to work well. I was thinking you could drill a holes at each corners of the base and install 4 levelers, like these (http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss? ... rs&x=0&y=0). Some have slippery finishes to avoid scratching furniture, so you might have to consider getting a set with rubber bottoms.

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Re: A DIY Book Scanner In Every Hackerspace /DIY Kit

Post by ateeq85 » 08 Oct 2011, 19:24

Is there any way to find out exactly what screws are used in the design and is there any model number or anything I can look for if I go to buy them at a hardware store and what exactly is the handle that the brake lever is attached to and where can one be bought I thought it was a peg but I was wrong.

And is the piece that triggers the camera shutter tht the bike brake uses included in the Cnc designs or is it a separate peiece. And is it simple to put together

Also would it be a simple Design add on to make an atachable flat surface for the top of the scanner above the led light tht can snap on when it Is flipped around to scan paperbacks
Last edited by ateeq85 on 08 Oct 2011, 19:28, edited 2 times in total.

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Re: Engineering challenge... Pivoting, self-adjusting spine

Post by rob » 08 Oct 2011, 19:26

daniel_reetz wrote:Mechanically speaking, the solution is a spine support that can rotate the spine a few degrees right and left from the central pivot point of the spine, longitudinally along it, like a super-wide teeter-totter. Maybe some skate-bearing thing can be cooked up... it is only necessary for larger books, so I'm realizing as I write this that it's entirely possible to have it be a drop-in-insert.
Maybe three support grooves side by side? Two on one side as you start, remove one and keep the middle for the middle of the book, then slide another one on the other side? This way at least the supports are identical and easily replaceable if one breaks or falls into Lake Tele, site of an ancient UFO crashlanding.
The Singularity is Near. ~ http://halfbakedmaker.org ~ Follow me as I build the world's first all-mechanical steam-powered computer.

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Re: A DIY Book Scanner In Every Hackerspace /DIY Kit

Post by daniel_reetz » 08 Oct 2011, 20:39

vitorio wrote:How long does the current 4'x8' pattern take to cut?

The local workshop with a Shopbot that large is $75/hr. runtime plus $100/hr. setup and tooling, so of course I'd prefer to minimize that. They expect to code up the plans themselves (I have no CNC experience) so I'd want them to incorporate any changes made up to that point, and then I'd work with them to re-release them or further optimize them.
That's an interesting set of numbers. I know some ShopBot owners who may be able to make the code for us.

Time on the machine is dependent on the artwork and the machine capabilities. On my machine, I was EXTREMELY cautious, taking very shallow passes, etc, and the cutting time was 2 hours. I think we can get it below 1 hour with experienced machine programmers, perhaps much less than an hour. This is an area where experience goes a long way.

You may be able to subsidize your scanner by making a few wood sets for others - I would definitely cut more than one to help alleviate that setup fee. Put up an ad here in Agora if you like, I'd bet there are people who would buy a set.
vitorio wrote:I don't know anyone else in town interested in having one of their own, but the local hackerspace will take one, I think.

Has anyone made an itemized parts list yet?
Nope. On Monday I need to call Fastenal to get the part numbers of everything I bought there.

miket161 wrote: Wouldn't a couple more channels make it adjustable enough? Maybe a flat along the length of the round dowel for infinite adjustment?
Or do you want to avoid having to make any adjustments at all?
Yes, that would work, but it's a pain to adjust the book while scanning. I would like to make a system that is self-adjusting, because pulling the book out and adjusting mid-scan sucks and slows things down.

ateeq85 wrote:Is there any way to find out exactly what screws are used in the design and is there any model number or anything I can look for if I go to buy them at a hardware store and what exactly is the handle that the brake lever is attached to and where can one be bought I thought it was a peg but I was wrong.
I haven't put up the fastener part numbers yet, but I will soon. I bought everything at Fastenal so it should be easy. Calling on Monday to get them.
ateeq85 wrote:And is the piece that triggers the camera shutter tht the bike brake uses included in the Cnc designs or is it a separate peiece. And is it simple to put together Also would it be a simple Design add on to make an atachable flat surface for the top of the scanner above the led light tht can snap on when it Is flipped around to scan paperbacks
The camera shutter pieces are laser cut birch. The artwork is not in these files. I have them on a machine that is in storage at the moment. I will get to them as soon as possible. Sorry about that.

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Re: A DIY Book Scanner In Every Hackerspace /DIY Kit

Post by ateeq85 » 08 Oct 2011, 22:20

Does the grip piece attached to the bike brake lever come from there as well or was this from something else what exactly is it

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Re: A DIY Book Scanner In Every Hackerspace /DIY Kit

Post by daniel_reetz » 09 Oct 2011, 12:17

It is a seatpost from a child's bmx bike. It has a bolt and washer inserted in it.

Also, I will post a full teardown as soon as possible. Have patience, I don't even have a place to live right now, so some of these things will take a little time.

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