Daniel Reetz, the founder of the DIY Book Scanner community, has recently started making videos of prototyping and shop tips. If you are tinkering with a book scanner (or any other project) in your home shop, these tips will come in handy. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCn0gq8 ... g_8K1nfInQ

Self-Adjusting Spine Support

Built a scanner? Started to build a scanner? Record your progress here. Doesn't need to be a whole scanner - triggers and other parts are fine. Commercial scanners are fine too.
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jck57
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Re: Self-Adjusting Spine Support

Post by jck57 » 03 May 2012, 17:10

The two wings are independent, and the amount they are separated by is determined by the length of the string underneath holding them together. The elastic cords pull the wings apart, so that the string is always taut, and the separation is maintained. To change the spacing, the string's length is adjusted.
Succinctly stated, Rob.

By accident I discovered what happened with the spacing when the book was open at one of the ends vs. when it was open near the center. Because the string runs underneath the wings which have a thickness, the distance that remains constant is the distance between the edges of the bottom of the wings. Measured from the top planes of the wings, that distance changes depending on which part of the book is open. The greatest distance between the top planes of the wings is when the front or back page is open. The shortest distance between the planes of the top surfaces of the wings is when the book is open to the middle. In practice this means that if you set the gap so that there is no arch under the spine when the book is open to the first page, there will be an arch when the book is open to the middle.

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jck57
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Re: Self-Adjusting Spine Support

Post by jck57 » 03 May 2012, 17:41

daniel_reetz wrote:Before I run, I just realized... One thing I need to note (not for anyone here specifically, but for everyone's understanding) - as noted in the original zip file, this design is Open Hardware - deriving designs from the original design means that in the fullness of time all improvements need to be shared back, at least if you distribute anything derived from them. I have a much longer post on this coming up that explains my personal position, but regardless people might be interested in further investigating the license and what it means for their plans.

I've applied for patents on two occasions. I didn't get the patents because I quit the applications. If I would have kept sending money to my patent attorney no doubt I could have gotten patents. My patent attorney secured a patent for a drill bit in a ziploc bag. Not the drill bit. Not the ziploc bag. But a patent on a ziploc bag with a drill bit inside. No doubt some of the inventions I've posted on this site could be patented. I could tote a a suitcase full of money to a patent attorney and in a couple of years get a piece of paper that would legally prohibit anybody in this country from using or selling the same embodiment for twenty years unless I grant permission.

Powerful is the dream of easy money. But money's not everything. Before finding this site, I had already worked out my own thoughts about patents. I think they are counter-productive and don't efficiently serve the common good. Thanks to Daniel and Rob there is a place where people can invent for the fun of it and share their ideas for the good of all. We're not saving the world here but this site is a fine example of how community is supposed to work.

Sometimes I put my own name, "Monson," on the subject line of a build. Besides basic human vanity ;) , I do this to establish an origin for my ideas. Only the original inventor can patent his idea. If the inventor publicly discloses his invention, he has a year to apply for a patent or that idea becomes part of the public domain forever. It is my intent for every idea or invention I post on this forum to immediately and perpetually belong to the public domain.

Fab52
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Re: Self-Adjusting Spine Support

Post by Fab52 » 03 May 2012, 23:30

Hi Jck,

I read your last post for the last 3 hours trying to figure out what the hell you wanted to do with a Zip Lock and a bit drill.... You're realy good at getting the Hamster in my head start spinning.... :lol: I like it !!!!

You're a genius for sure, but like you say there is no money and no goods for the community in the process of patented something....

Like one of the inventor overhere toll me one day , just share your find with the community before someone stoll you and make big profit out of it....

He was the inventor of the plastic bag for the baby bottle.... no air suck.... Since I do not have a copy of the agreement between him and the CO. who market his invention since mid 60'... I could not tell you if he received a penny per thoushand or a penny per millon bag sold.....

Hey!!! He died poor few here ago!!!

Keep sharing your genius with us.... At least if you died poor nobody will say we make millon $ out of your genius!!!

See you!!!

Fab.

bonesgeorge
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Re: Self-Adjusting Spine Support

Post by bonesgeorge » 04 May 2012, 05:27

I was too tired last night after 5 hours of traveling, but now I put up some information on the dimensions, and as I had not taken the machining time as an aspect in consideration, I did a few changes in this regard.

The length between the bearings at the bottom part of the stands doesn't have to be longer than in the earlier cradle. Simply because the wings are of the same size, and even if one of the wings rolls all the way up to the stands top it won't make any difference since it's gonna be balanced on the other wing where the heavier part of the book will lay. Conclusively, no need for elongating of this part.

Summing up the other changes I did so far:

1. Corrected the image of the bigger cross member in the middle.
2. Reshaped the stands a bit to make cutting easier and faster.
3. Equalized the angle of the stay in the stand.

Rob, could you make a proper plan in .PDF that I can print of these; I would like to make these cuts Monday when I get to my builds? :roll:

Dimensions

Image

Redesigned Cradle Stands

Image

Stands with less cut still complementing each other, saving loads of material

Image

Size reduction by the stands

Image

should be lookin' somethin' this..

Image

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jck57
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Re: Self-Adjusting Spine Support

Post by jck57 » 04 May 2012, 11:06

Another way to do the wing bearings. I cut 5/16-18 threaded rod 2" long and then cut screwdriver slots but extra long set screws like this are available retail. With full size nuts the groove that the bearings ride on could only be about 1/8", which would work but a little deeper would be better so I ground some nuts down to about 13/32" OD. Anybody know of ready-made nuts like this?

You can fine tune the lateral position of the bearing by rotating the rod with a screwdriver.
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rob
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Re: Self-Adjusting Spine Support

Post by rob » 04 May 2012, 11:28

Here's my first shot at a PDF:
Attachments
new cradle.pdf
(224.72 KiB) Downloaded 254 times
The Singularity is Near. ~ http://halfbakedmaker.org ~ Follow me as I build the world's first all-mechanical steam-powered computer.

bonesgeorge
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Re: Self-Adjusting Spine Support

Post by bonesgeorge » 04 May 2012, 12:34

jck57 wrote:Another way to do the wing bearings. I cut 5/16-18 threaded rod 2" long and then cut screwdriver slots but extra long set screws like this are available retail. With full size nuts the groove that the bearings ride on could only be about 1/8", which would work but a little deeper would be better so I ground some nuts down to about 13/32" OD. Anybody know of ready-made nuts like this?

You can fine tune the lateral position of the bearing by rotating the rod with a screwdriver.
rob wrote:Here's my first shot at a PDF:

Gentlemen, I'm more than impressed, it's pretty early over there, isn't it? Rob, thanks for the plans, I can't wait to see them printed, and start the cutting!

This is a real good idea to use the threaded rod as you can't have it cut in most of the stores, or at least here in Europe, the length you need for the handle bar, so it won't go wasted, and neither will rise the prize of a scanner.

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jck57
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Re: Self-Adjusting Spine Support

Post by jck57 » 04 May 2012, 15:49

Fab52 wrote:Hi Jck,

I read your last post for the last 3 hours trying to figure out what the hell you wanted to do with a Zip Lock and a bit drill....
Hi Fab. I didn't understand the drill bit in the bag either. It was a patent my attorney wrote up for somebody else.

dpc
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Re: Self-Adjusting Spine Support

Post by dpc » 04 May 2012, 16:32

jck57 wrote:Another way to do the wing bearings. I cut 5/16-18 threaded rod 2" long and then cut screwdriver slots but extra long set screws like this are available retail. With full size nuts the groove that the bearings ride on could only be about 1/8", which would work but a little deeper would be better so I ground some nuts down to about 13/32" OD. Anybody know of ready-made nuts like this?

You can fine tune the lateral position of the bearing by rotating the rod with a screwdriver.
Nut grinding? That must have been a finger warmer. What you ended up with is known as a threaded spacer. You can find them in a variety of sizes and materials, but the OD for something with a 5/16 threaded hole is likely going to be too big for what you're doing. When I've done things like this in the past, I've bought a piece of aluminum tubing and reamed/tapped the hole myself, then lopped off the length I needed, but you might be able to find something online. Rather than grinding a hex nut, you could grind the tabs off of a Tee nut (http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page=1592) a bit easier. I've torn those tabs off with a pair of pliers before, so it won't take much.

If clearance is the issue, you could drop to a 1/4-20 axle and use a bushing in the bearing. That might allow you to use a common nut with no grinding. Use an off-the-shelf socket cap screw and you won't have to cut a screwdriver slot.

I'm curious as to why you're using a bored hole around the bearing instead of a slot that is the width of the bearing (plus enough for a washer on each side)? If used a slot instead you won't need any nuts at all. Those CNC machines make pretty accurate cuts. How much lateral fine-tuning do you think will be necessary?

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jck57
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Re: Self-Adjusting Spine Support

Post by jck57 » 04 May 2012, 18:53

I'm curious as to why you're using a bored hole around the bearing instead of a slot that is the width of the bearing (plus enough for a washer on each side)? If used a slot instead you won't need any nuts at all. Those CNC machines make pretty accurate cuts.[/quote]

Well, slap my mouth. You're absolutely right. Thanks, dpc. :)

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