Daniel Reetz, the founder of the DIY Book Scanner community, has recently started making videos of prototyping and shop tips. If you are tinkering with a book scanner (or any other project) in your home shop, these tips will come in handy. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCn0gq8 ... g_8K1nfInQ

Red shift...

Built a scanner? Started to build a scanner? Record your progress here. Doesn't need to be a whole scanner - triggers and other parts are fine. Commercial scanners are fine too.
cfmorrill
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Red shift...

Post by cfmorrill » 10 Dec 2011, 17:47

So thanks to GaryK posting the full sheet layout of all his parts, Wes and I were able to cut out Gary's version of Daniel's new scanner this morning. This was done at Gaston and Wyatt in Charlottesville, Virginia. We're an architectural millwork firm supplying custom doors, windows, mouldings (my specialty), and just about anything for high end residential jobs and historic homes primarily on the Eastern seaboard. The firm's owner, Rick Wyatt donated a wonderful sheet of 3/4 thick baltic birch 4 X 8 plywood left over from an auditorium we had supplied panels for. It's beautiful stuff, a whole lot of plies, painted red on one side. It seemed especially cool for no reason I can quite put my finger on.

I guess it makes it all look like it came from Ikea...

That was real nice of Rick. Our cost per sheet is well over $100

Wes Leach programmed the machine for a case of beer. Here's what it looked like with the vacuum hold down on just before cutting:
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We used a solid carbide combination up and down sheer bit. Here we are just beginning the program. The diagonal cuts are the grooves for the glass:
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A few minutes later we were all cut out:
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And not long after that I began grouping the parts together.
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I decided that for this go around, I would simply have the machine cut the pass through holes for the parts housing the skateboard bearings. I have an idea I'm dying to try out for a simple drill press jig that would eliminate the need fixturing cut outs. Similarly, I decided to dispense with a number of the other rabs and dados because I was interested in experimenting with different ideas. Then too, I needed to bother Wes as little as possible and get on and off an expensive machine quickly. Besides what you see here, there's a room full of vacuum pumps and a three story high dust collector running outside. It's considered good form to take all this into account.

Once again, a great design from Daniel, and many thanks to GaryK for uploading his version and going the extra mile by laying all the parts out. It wouldn't have happened without both of you, not to mention dbmoura's wonderful sketchup drawings that I'm always referring to. It also wouldn't have happened without Rick Wyatt loaning us a half million dollars of machinery for fun on a Saturday morning. Thanks, Rick. All of you rock.

I took some video. I'll try to get it up on youtube but I've never done that so it may take a couple of days. Off to get skateboard bearings and other fasteners. Also am dog tired.


Cheers, Charles Morrill

GaryK

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Post by GaryK » 11 Dec 2011, 08:26

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Last edited by GaryK on 17 Dec 2011, 14:54, edited 1 time in total.

cfmorrill
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Re: Red shift...

Post by cfmorrill » 11 Dec 2011, 09:12

Looks like you left some things out, like the 241 block and the bushings for the handle. Too bad you didn't have the pockets done. It would save a lot of time and hand work.
I think I can do the pocketing for the bearings both faster and more accurately on a drill press. But I've got to try it out. That's part of the fun. I'm replacing all of the fixturing jigs with a single stepped locating button engaging the smaller clearance hole.

I've a good friend with a pile of used bike parts, so I think I'm good with the handle. He's something of a hoarder and also collects used skateboard bearings for no particular reason. Trouble is, I'm finding that one doesn't want used skateboard bearings. The pile of trash bearings I've got seem way worse than no bearings at all...

I love your version with the round lamps from Lowes. I've always liked them and the price is right.

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daniel_reetz
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Re: Red shift...

Post by daniel_reetz » 11 Dec 2011, 17:03

Nice build! Glad to see it coming together. And red looks rad. :D

Skate bearings are real cheap - so new ones are probably worth the money.

That Onsrud looks like serious stuff. My homemade CNC is a flexible, wobbly thing compared to a pro machine like that.

Question for you - how long did the cutting take on that machine?

cfmorrill
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Re: Red shift...

Post by cfmorrill » 11 Dec 2011, 22:46

Hi Daniel,
I think the time stamps on the pictures are pretty accurate, so about 35 minutes. If we had done all of the pocketing and the fixturing module I suspect we would have been around 45. Wes might have been able to ramp it up a bit more with standard poplar core birch ply. This stuff has so many veneers and so much glue it strikes as me as a very different material.

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daniel_reetz
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Re: Red shift...

Post by daniel_reetz » 11 Dec 2011, 22:55

Leave it to me to miss the obvious time stamps. ;) 45 minutes is pretty excellent; I've heard many shops quote between a dollar and two dollars a minute.

cfmorrill
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Location: Charlottesville, Virginia

Re: Red shift...

Post by cfmorrill » 18 Dec 2011, 21:33

Here's the latest progress:

Image

Lest you think I know what I am doing, here's a significant mistake. I had planned to cut the rabs (rebates) for the book cradle track on a tablesaw and so deleted them. Trouble was my friend and I deleted a whole lot more than intended and the cnc router just cut the material for the tracks right away. I noticed Lowes had an aluminum channel extrusion for sale pretty cheap so I ripped one side off on the tablesaw and screwed it on. Works well but the screws are awfully low. My guess is they'll cause the plywood to delaminate and I'll have to make it over. We'll see. If I rebuild I'll do it in solid wood or just get Wes to program it correctly but I'm out of beer money...

Image

I'm using number 8 wood screws for fastening the parts without holes for 1/4 X 20 bolts. Am also loosely bolting things together at this point to see how it all fits. Plan on changing one or two things before final assembly in the week after christmas. The red is fun but I increasingly suspect way too bright for book scanning purposes and I'm going to shoot it all flat black. Check out the topic "button, button" for the way I cut the bearing pockets. Might make sense for future builds...On to the handle and camera trigger mechanisms for the coming week.

Regards, Charles

Image

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daniel_reetz
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Re: Red shift...

Post by daniel_reetz » 19 Dec 2011, 01:17

I had planned to cut the rabs (rebates) for the book cradle track
Did you mean rabbits?... as we write up documentation, are there any other woodworking terms we might use? I have essentially zero classical woodworking knowledge, as was obvious from my first files. Thanks to you, GaryK, and others like jck57, I've learned a lot about how to describe things. There's also some effort (much delayed by me) to document this thing on the wiki, primarily by Bob Fitterman. Dario has also produced a suite of images and drawings to accompany Bob's work, I just haven't labeled it all yet.

Sorry this is a little fragmented, anyway, please continue to share your woodworking knowledge and I will do my best to catch up with all the documentation, posting files, and the rest this week.

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jck57
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Re: Red shift...

Post by jck57 » 19 Dec 2011, 11:53

daniel_reetz wrote:
I had planned to cut the rabs (rebates) for the book cradle track
Did you mean rabbits?...
Rabbets.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rabbet

ateeq85
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Re: Red shift...

Post by ateeq85 » 19 Dec 2011, 14:29

cfmorill do you remember the glass dimensions required for this build I don't think it is the original 9 x 14 du to the changes made do you think it may have been 11 1/2 x 14. GaryK's posts are all gone so I can't reference it back to them to confirm.

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