Daniel Reetz, the founder of the DIY Book Scanner community, has recently started making videos of prototyping and shop tips. If you are tinkering with a book scanner (or any other project) in your home shop, these tips will come in handy. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCn0gq8 ... g_8K1nfInQ

Intel new reader

Built a scanner? Started to build a scanner? Record your progress here. Doesn't need to be a whole scanner - triggers and other parts are fine. Commercial scanners are fine too.
gmmazza
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Intel new reader

Post by gmmazza » 25 Nov 2009, 21:12

Hi, I'm a new member of the forum, I just stumble here and I love this community, so much information. I hope I can add my grain of salt.(is like this that you say it?)

I was looking for the news in the ebook scanners field, and I just crossed with this development of intel
http://www.intel.com/healthcare/reader/video.htm
Advance to the minute 2.10 to see the capture station. I think that the solution to fix the pages is great, just a transparent tape fixed to a movable arc on a hinge. I know, no the best solution for perfect flat pages, but great for fast scanning and portable too. maybe that can be done in a V shaped plate and one for each page.

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Re: Intel new reader

Post by StevePoling » 25 Nov 2009, 22:57

Suppose you start with a v-shaped cradle as Daniel has designed, but instead of a glass or acrylic platen holding the page perfectly flat, you use a flexible transparent strip like the one shown in the video to hold the page just flat enough. (Perhaps something leftover from weatherstripping your windows for winter.)

B/c the book is held at 90 instead of 180 degrees open, the transparent strip would need to be held down in the middle. Use an infinitely narrow, transparent rod to hold the transparent strip in place. It needn't be attached via hingealellogram or drawer slide. It just needs to be weighted fore and aft enough to tension the transparent strip.

The pages would not be as flat as a rigid transparent sheet would hold them, but I hope they'd be flat enough for software to cope. And since the strip and rod wouldn't be perfectly transparent, you'd have to subtract them out in software, too.

Would this work?

gmmazza
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Re: Intel new reader

Post by gmmazza » 01 Dec 2009, 08:21

Hi Steve,
I don't know if this could work, my first impression is no.
But I saw that this could maybe work for some kind of portable scanner, because of the flexibility and the low weight. In a V shape this could be run vertically instead of horizontally and have 2 strips, one per page. Also this still could work with a correction software like the atiz snapter. I know is not the best solution, but just posted because I thought is a novel idea.

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Re: Intel new reader

Post by daniel_reetz » 01 Dec 2009, 10:12

I think a more basic question here is: what are people willing to sacrifice for portability? I mean, in truth, you can just walk into a library with a camera and get usable captures... a tripod if you're really trying.

I think the portable/guerilla scanner is still a totally interesting idea. In many cases, I don't care about quality, just access. Some things bug me -- the acrylic plate scanner that was posted a while ago would have real problems with an image of the camera being visible in every page -- I couldn't stand that. But there must be a "good enough" solution... I think the capture station in the linked video is pretty close. And we have already had thoughts about using taught membranes somewhere on this forum...

gmmazza
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Re: Intel new reader

Post by gmmazza » 01 Dec 2009, 14:10

Thank you Daniel, I think that you have made great points, I didn't know that was analyzed before in the forum, sorry for repeating information, just too new to the forum, I still didn't had time to see all the posts.
I will try to investigate better before posting.
But still neat solution he! :) imagine that briefcase open partially in a V shaped way and put the camera in one side, not on top. I think that your solution for your latest scanner in the hinge for the glass frame is great and could be adapted to some kind of briefcase like this. but with film to make it lighter. an only one camera on the side.

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Re: Intel new reader

Post by spamsickle » 01 Dec 2009, 16:19

Hey, don't worry about posting something that's "somewhere else in the forum." Most people aren't going to read the whole forum, or remember where the bit of information they want was posted. Some days, there are no new posts at all, so I think having the same information in more than one place shouldn't be a problem.

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Re: Intel new reader

Post by StevePoling » 02 Dec 2009, 04:02

Consider the forces on a page in a book held open in a cradle at 90 degrees. Gravity is pulling the pages against the cradle. The binding is applying a twisting moment at the spine. Most troubling, the weight of adjacent pages is making them want to "flow" toward the spine. (You'll see this in a Bible, with its many thin paper pages. But thinner volumes with thicker paper less so.)

The binding and the "flow" conspire to curve the pages, Dan's rigid plastic platen counters this by applying a counter-force on the pages where the curve the most. (I imagine the platen just touches the outer edges of the page.) Suppose we remove all the material from Dan's platen except that part countering the curve of the pages. What if the material that was left fit within the margins of the book? Or if it didn't, we narrowed the material, spread the angle of the platen to 90 degrees plus epsilon, and applied greater downward force.

Would this hold the pages "flat enough?"

Now, suppose that instead of using transparent material, we replace the cut-down-platen with a Green wedge. And we make the cradle that same Green color. (Or some other Odd Color Never Used In This Book.) Then program the software to first blank all Green pixels.

What do you think?

I'm just gassing here guys. If I wasn't lazy, I'd be building something instead of asking about wacky ideas. But if this doesn't sound totally stupid, I'd like to know if anyone thinks it's worth trying out.

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Re: Intel new reader

Post by daniel_reetz » 02 Dec 2009, 14:15

It's hard to imagine the mechanism, can you throw together a sketch? In a way, it sounds like what this Kirtas machine does -- see the plastic flappy bits pressed into the book?

http://chronicle.com/blogPost/George-Washington-U/9036/

gmmazza
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Re: Intel new reader

Post by gmmazza » 03 Dec 2009, 14:25

not exactly, much more basic than that.. I will work some sketches over the weekend.

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Re: Intel new reader

Post by spamsickle » 03 Dec 2009, 16:26

For me, the most problematic area of the book is the inner margin. If I tried to scan many pocket-sized paperbacks, it would be difficult to do without cutting off letters there. A device that actually obscures part of the page in that area would make the problem worse. As it is, those books currently go in my "cut the spine and feed the pages" pile, but I've run into the problem of slim inner margins in other books as well.

I do see how having the platen upside down would have its advantages in making gravity work for you instead of against you in keeping the pages open and spreading them rather than compressing them. All of the designs I can imagine to take advantage of that would seem to make it difficult to turn the pages in the book, but maybe someone will have an insight that's eluding me.

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