Daniel Reetz, the founder of the DIY Book Scanner community, has recently started making videos of prototyping and shop tips. If you are tinkering with a book scanner (or any other project) in your home shop, these tips will come in handy. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCn0gq8 ... g_8K1nfInQ

Book (camera-based) Scanner versus Flatbed Scanner

Built a scanner? Started to build a scanner? Record your progress here. Doesn't need to be a whole scanner - triggers and other parts are fine. Commercial scanners are fine too.
dtic
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Re: Book (camera-based) Scanner versus Flatbed Scanner

Post by dtic » 14 Mar 2010, 10:44

rob: Wow, that scanrobot is cool! Once you have a robot then scan time is no issue I guess. Has anyone here tried building an automatic page turner like that for a DIY camera scanner?

possum: They needn't collide. Think of four sensors 10 cm apart attached to the same "rail". When you start to scan, they all move 11 cm to one side (and then move back again). Software then finds and trims the overlap and outputs the joined image. That should cover a sheet bigger than A4 size.

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daniel_reetz
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Re: Book (camera-based) Scanner versus Flatbed Scanner

Post by daniel_reetz » 14 Mar 2010, 21:07

I have spent a fair amount of time hacking the guts of flatbed scanners. I have removed the edges of a CIS scanner (a canon LiDE series) and had the same issue. I have also tried to modify the optics of flatbed scanners to get right to the gutter. In the end, it was a hopeless waste of time. I still had to use crappy proprietary drivers, and was still locked into whatever hardware when it was over (since each scanner is different).

On another note, as far as I know, no diy book scanner builder has attempted to make a page turner... yet.

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Re: Book (camera-based) Scanner versus Flatbed Scanner

Post by possum » 15 Mar 2010, 04:49

oh yeah, duh. Still, it seems like it would be a very complicated undertaking. Way out of my league.

Thanks for sharing your experiences Daniel. Curiosity probably would have got the better of me at some point, in which case you've saved me considerable time and frustration, and a scanner that's perfectly alright for what it does - flat things.

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Re: Book (camera-based) Scanner versus Flatbed Scanner

Post by daniel_reetz » 15 Mar 2010, 08:31

heh, don't get me wrong, possum, I highly recommend modifying things and taking them apart, even (and especially) in hopeless circumstances. it's educational, relaxing, and improves your complexion.

unless you are hacking flatbed scanners, that is, which is pain and frustration in a concentrated form not ordinarily found in nature.

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Re: Book (camera-based) Scanner versus Flatbed Scanner

Post by daddyE » 16 Mar 2010, 11:05

Thanks for the responses everyone! Based on what was said, it seems that a mix of methods is necessary.

For instance, even if you aren't going to destroy the bindings, you still probably want a flatbed/documentfed scanner around for scanning other miscellaneous papers. And even if you ARE destroying bindings, there are always going to be a few books that you either a) don't want to destroy, b) can't destroy, or c) are too large for the flatbed scanner; and for those you'll need a custom, camera-based scanner.

This weekend I experimented by using my basic Canon Powershot SD990is (14.1 megapixel) digital camera to "scan" of a set of house plans and also a few pages of some books. The house plans are a unique case, because the DIY book scanners posted on this site wouldn't support the large size of the paper anyway. My results were great. When I viewed the resulting images I could easily make out all of the handwritten text on the house plan. And that's without any special lighting or camera positioning/stabilization.... just me holding the camera over the document using my normal office lighting. The only downside was that the paper wasn't completely flat in all cases. I tried putting a piece of glass over the paper but the table underneath wasn't flat enough. (so it's a problem I could work out, but didn't care to at the time).

For the next stage, I think I'm going to start by destroying a couple books (bindings) and feeding the paper through a Ricoh MP-C2800 scanner at my office. The Ricoh is fast and has acceptable quality, plus there's no cost to me to try it out (except a couple destroyed books if I can't get them to scan in!). I want to then take those scans through the whole post-production process to get an idea of what will be required in the long run. Once that is complete (and I'm happy with the results), then I will start planning my own camera-based scanner. For me, that's also where the expenses are going to start to rack up, as I currently don't have a DSLR (let alone 2 of them) to use for the project.

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Re: Book (camera-based) Scanner versus Flatbed Scanner

Post by Misty » 16 Mar 2010, 11:30

DSLRs aren't necessary unless you're looking to have really high quality images of the exact original appearance of the items. Most users are primarily interested in the text of a book, and inexpensive compact cameras work great for that. "Bridge" cameras are a cheaper option too - I use a Canon PowerShot G10, which is not DSLR quality but which provides much higher quality images than compact digicams, and have been getting excellent quality from it.
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Re: Book (camera-based) Scanner versus Flatbed Scanner

Post by Antoha-spb » 19 Mar 2010, 08:31

daniel_reetz wrote:I have spent a fair amount of time hacking the guts of flatbed scanners. I have removed the edges of a CIS scanner (a canon LiDE series) and had the same issue. I have also tried to modify the optics of flatbed scanners to get right to the gutter. In the end, it was a hopeless waste of time. I still had to use crappy proprietary drivers, and was still locked into whatever hardware when it was over (since each scanner is different).
Dan, did u try S.A.N.E. (linux) drivers or VueScan app that operates some hardware directly, bypassing standard drivers?

I also thought about disassembling some crappy scanner for further 'customization' and contacted Ed Hamrick (VueScan author) with a question about custom control of a scanner in his app, but didn't sucseed much...

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daniel_reetz
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Re: Book (camera-based) Scanner versus Flatbed Scanner

Post by daniel_reetz » 19 Mar 2010, 08:42

Both, actually. Normally, I use Vuescan for everything, but since I was changing the scanner lamp for an LED lamp (long story -- I'll share sometime), I decided to go the more hardcore route and used SANE. I searched forever for a scanner to use with SANE, ended up choosing the Epson Perfection 1170, bought several on eBay, and failed miserably. In the end, my friend Matti was able to make them go with his el33t linux skillz. :)

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Re: Book (camera-based) Scanner versus Flatbed Scanner

Post by rob » 19 Mar 2010, 11:03

For paperbacks, which apparently have no worth to collectors, it still kinda pains me to slice it up. I've been doing some experimentation on that. I took an ordinary clothing iron, heated it up to its highest setting, put a sheet of paper on it, and rubbed the spine against the piece of paper. The glue melted and I was able to easily remove the cover from the text block. The remaining problem is to get the glue off the text block, which I think is going to be more difficult....
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Re: Book (camera-based) Scanner versus Flatbed Scanner

Post by spamsickle » 20 Mar 2010, 19:00

I still recommend a utility knife. For paperbacks, you end up with a beautiful "collectible" spine.

For hardbacks, I generally separate the pages from the cover first by slicing through the end papers. Then, I break the book into bundles by splitting them between whatever those sewn sheafs are called. Then, once again, it's a utility knife and a metal ruler for each individual bundle.

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