Daniel Reetz, the founder of the DIY Book Scanner community, has recently started making videos of prototyping and shop tips. If you are tinkering with a book scanner (or any other project) in your home shop, these tips will come in handy. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCn0gq8 ... g_8K1nfInQ

Monson's Sticks: Cheap Single Camera Rig with Remote

Built a scanner? Started to build a scanner? Record your progress here. Doesn't need to be a whole scanner - triggers and other parts are fine. Commercial scanners are fine too.
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daniel_reetz
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Re: Monson's Sticks: Cheap Single Camera Rig with Remote

Post by daniel_reetz » 07 Jun 2010, 13:19

I really like the ingenuity here. It would be great to somehow automagickally move the book up against the platen with a treadle, and have your auto-button-presser use the same treadle mechanism. In any case, great work and refreshing approach!

I saw on the YT video that you're using the flash -- mind posting a sample page from a book with glossy paper? I'm very curious if you get any glare or not, since I haven't done much with the so-called "air-platens" like yours.

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Re: Monson's Sticks: Cheap Single Camera Rig with Remote

Post by jck57 » 07 Jun 2010, 19:53

Thanks, Daniel. The weight of the books hasn't been much of a problem. When the book feels heavy, I rest it on my legs while turning pages.

Using flash on glossy pages washes out a spot in the center. Flash is ok on regular paper but since it slows the camera down and drains the batteries, I think i'll use lights. So far, ambient light has been adequate.

Another thing that speeds up camera shutter cycles is Automatic Focus Lock (AFL). On my A480, I press the shutter part-way and focus, then push the four way button to the left, locking the focus for multiple shots.

Also, rubbery kitchen shelf liner from the Dollar Store works better than pricey tool box liner.

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Re: Monson's Sticks: Cheap Single Camera Rig with Remote

Post by jck57 » 09 Jun 2010, 20:31

Version 1.3. Cut down the plywood base for the camera holder. Shortened the camera arm. Counter-bored the plywood camera holder so an o-ring would fit, thus keeping the camera attachment screw from falling out and getting lost. Added inch rules on the oak sticks and luan tops to speed up page sizing. Switched to kitchen shelf liner. Cleaned up the plumbing. Sandwiched some luan between the pivot block and the base so the arm can fold flat. Collapsed package size reduced to 24x10x3". Weight reduced from 5 to 4 pounds. New pictures added to original post. Anyone wants more detailed dimensions or specs, let me know.
Last edited by jck57 on 12 Jun 2010, 14:48, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Monson's Sticks: Cheap Single Camera Rig with Remote

Post by StevePoling » 11 Jun 2010, 12:08

Instead of threading the eye-bolt through an undersized hole in the oak actuator arm, you could drill out the hole to slightly larger than the bolt, drive a t-nut through the hole, then thread the eye-bolt through the t-nut. (I think every junk box should have a mason jar of furniture fasteners.)

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Re: Monson's Sticks: Cheap Single Camera Rig with Remote

Post by jck57 » 11 Jun 2010, 15:52

StevePoling wrote:Instead of threading the eye-bolt through an undersized hole in the oak actuator arm, you could drill out the hole to slightly larger than the bolt, drive a t-nut through the hole, then thread the eye-bolt through the t-nut. (I think every junk box should have a mason jar of furniture fasteners.)
Ok. You must mean put the t-nut on the camera side and then to lock the eybolt add a washer and wingnut on the other side. Yeah, that would work.

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Re: Monson's Sticks: Cheap Single Camera Rig with Remote

Post by Misty » 16 Jun 2010, 10:09

JCK, your scanner was one of two community scanner designs I showed people in my short talk at this year's TAATU archivists' tech unconference (along with Dan's new standard scanner). It was definitely popular. People liked the idea behind its simplicity and ergonomics.
The opinions expressed in this post are my own and do not necessarily represent those of the Canadian Museum for Human Rights.

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Re: Monson's Sticks: Cheap Single Camera Rig with Remote

Post by jck57 » 19 Jun 2010, 21:20

Misty wrote:JCK, your scanner was one of two community scanner designs I showed people in my short talk at this year's TAATU archivists' tech unconference (along with Dan's new standard scanner). It was definitely popular. People liked the idea behind its simplicity and ergonomics.
Thanks, Misty. It feels good knowing professional archivists like you and your colleagues appreciate my work. I want to go to a barcamp!

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Re: Monson's Sticks: Cheap Single Camera Rig with Remote

Post by jimb » 01 Jul 2010, 10:15

How did you mount the turkey baster to the camera arm?

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Re: Monson's Sticks: Cheap Single Camera Rig with Remote

Post by jck57 » 01 Jul 2010, 12:07

jimb wrote:How did you mount the turkey baster to the camera arm?
The baster is clamped to a short piece of 1/2" pvc pipe which in turn is glued to an adapter. This assembly is inserted through a hole bored in the camera arm. The hole is larger than the PVC adapter but smaller than the turkey baster, so the spring pressure on the superball holds it in place without any other attachment needed.

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Re: Monson's Sticks: Cheap Single Camera Rig with Remote

Post by jimb » 08 Jul 2010, 22:13

Built slightly modified copy of this design this week and then built a carrying case. Took 400+ pictures at the library today in about three hours with no problems. Running scan tailor now and the results are fabulous.

Setup and case are probably about twenty pounds and that was a bit much to carry across campus in 90+ heat. Change between books adds some time. But it is better than any alternatives I have found for setting up in a library!

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