Daniel Reetz, the founder of the DIY Book Scanner community, has recently started making videos of prototyping and shop tips. If you are tinkering with a book scanner (or any other project) in your home shop, these tips will come in handy. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCn0gq8 ... g_8K1nfInQ

Finished my scanner

Built a scanner? Started to build a scanner? Record your progress here. Doesn't need to be a whole scanner - triggers and other parts are fine. Commercial scanners are fine too.
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n9yty
Posts: 72
Joined: 25 Jul 2010, 22:13

Re: Finished my scanner

Post by n9yty » 27 Jul 2010, 01:20

Do you have measurements? I'd love to see a similar guide as for the "New Standard" scanner but using this construction. :) Although this may not be quite as easily within the range of a casual DIY-er, or is it?

jcii
Posts: 2
Joined: 04 Mar 2014, 00:52

Re: Finished my scanner

Post by jcii » 29 Jul 2010, 01:38

I, too, would love measurements. I've been salivating over your pictures for the last two days, and starting to scrutinize the 80/20 ordering form.

Also, I'm interested in using glass and thinking about the 80/20 material for the platen frame. Did you experiment with that at all?

Awesome scanner. Thanks for posting the pics.

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JonEP
Posts: 81
Joined: 19 Apr 2010, 15:09

Re: Finished my scanner

Post by JonEP » 29 Jul 2010, 09:47

This is really gorgeous! Congratulations. It also seems like a model that might lend itself to being packaged for shipping? Perhaps leaving the cradle and platen to the consumer for local fabrication? Is the 80/20 very heavy?

Wow.

translucent1
Posts: 16
Joined: 05 Jun 2010, 20:40
E-book readers owned: kindle 1, kindle 2
Number of books owned: 300
Location: Pasadena, CA

Re: Finished my scanner

Post by translucent1 » 29 Jul 2010, 11:43

I suppose you could ship something like this without assembling it first. The only tools required for assembly are an allen wrench and a square. The frame itself probably weighs about 15 pounds, so it's not exactly light.
If I build another one (and I might - I had a lot of fun making the first one) I'll go with a more open frame, using just one vertical member on each side. The design I have is overbuilt, and while it operates just fine, it offends my engineering sensibilities to know that I wasted some material.

univurshul
Posts: 496
Joined: 04 Mar 2014, 00:53

Re: Finished my scanner

Post by univurshul » 29 Jul 2010, 11:51

translucent1 wrote: The design I have is overbuilt, and while it operates just fine, it offends my engineering sensibilities to know that I wasted some material.
It's a great 1st run with this type of aluminum stock; 15 lbs is nothing to be ashamed of.

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n9yty
Posts: 72
Joined: 25 Jul 2010, 22:13

Re: Finished my scanner

Post by n9yty » 29 Jul 2010, 13:56

But please, do product a write-up with dimensions. Please? :)

translucent1
Posts: 16
Joined: 05 Jun 2010, 20:40
E-book readers owned: kindle 1, kindle 2
Number of books owned: 300
Location: Pasadena, CA

Re: Finished my scanner

Post by translucent1 » 29 Jul 2010, 14:28

Do you want dimensions of all the individual pieces or just overall size?
I'm out of town for the weekend, and won't be able to measure anything until Monday.

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n9yty
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Joined: 25 Jul 2010, 22:13

Re: Finished my scanner

Post by n9yty » 29 Jul 2010, 15:19

Because I'm a computer guy and not so much a hands-on materials guy, I guess pretty much the (at least rough) measurements of the main components. The idea being that I could take a list, go on eBay, and buy the stuff and between that and looking at your photos put it together. The fact that it all interconnects so easily makes it highly attractive, it's just hard from looking at it (for me) to make guesses about the size and exactly what pieces are where.

Thanks for your great work, and willingness to share!

univurshul
Posts: 496
Joined: 04 Mar 2014, 00:53

Re: Finished my scanner

Post by univurshul » 29 Jul 2010, 19:01

n9yty wrote: The fact that it all interconnects so easily makes it highly attractive, it's just hard from looking at it (for me) to make guesses about the size and exactly what pieces are where.
n9ty,

After some light reading into aluminum extrusions and their characteristics, I have to be honest, that with translucent1's clever use of this material in this scanner build, it's clear that the functional design possibilities are endless with this extrusion-type.

This has come at a time where my own conceptual plans on a third build must admit that these extrusions are far superior than a once perceived aluminum pipe & plating design. A more integrated framework that closes-in on precision is really a great achievement. These aluminum structures are so versatile, torsionally strong and light, it only makes sense to construct a framework out of these.

Most of these sections can be cut on a chop saw with a 50-60t carbide blade, it's very similar to working with wood. If you're comfortable working with wood, these will be sized in similar fashion + the benefit of all the accessories pre-configured to mod your own rig. In addition, there's a few websites that have the CAD specs downloadable to your software allowing you to design in 3D drafting before you even buy any parts. Very cool.

Or, if you end up waiting a couple months, you'll likely see more DIY designs employing this framework.

The only drawback is the cost. But I too am looking at the fact that this material allows for high-concept/high quality results if built correctly. --A worthwhile expense, and still far less than a commercial scanning device.

jcii
Posts: 2
Joined: 04 Mar 2014, 00:52

Re: Finished my scanner

Post by jcii » 31 Jul 2010, 16:59

I'm imagining something like Chris & Ann's build, only out of aluminum.
http://www.diybookscanner.org/forum/vie ... ?f=1&t=186

- A double-wide (DW) extrusion for the vertical frame piece. The drawer-rails will attach to the vertical pieces.
- A DW extrusion for the top horizontal piece.
- For the bottom, two DW extrusions, with a single-wide extrusion connecting them to the rest of the frame. The two at the bottom are so the book tray will have two points of contact and move more fluidly.

I'm curious if the platen frame could be made from the 80/20 extrusion. The long edge of the glass would connect to the drawer-rail via a hinge of some sort.

Also, my sketch has the base somewhat narrow...maybe the 1x1 beams should be 10-12" long to give more stability?

Something like that should be sturdy and use less materials, no?
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