Daniel Reetz, the founder of the DIY Book Scanner community, has recently started making videos of prototyping and shop tips. If you are tinkering with a book scanner (or any other project) in your home shop, these tips will come in handy. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCn0gq8 ... g_8K1nfInQ

Input on the best way to build a portable scanner

Built a scanner? Started to build a scanner? Record your progress here. Doesn't need to be a whole scanner - triggers and other parts are fine. Commercial scanners are fine too.
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ceeann1
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Re: Input on the best way to build a portable scanner

Post by ceeann1 » 25 Nov 2010, 21:07

Moved to the Origami Scanner- a folding book scanner thread
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Re: Input on the best way to build a portable scanner

Post by ceeann1 » 25 Nov 2010, 21:09

Moved to the Origami Scanner- a folding book scanner thread
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Re: Input on the best way to build a portable scanner

Post by ceeann1 » 25 Nov 2010, 21:16

Moved to the Origami Scanner- a folding book scanner thread
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Re: Input on the best way to build a portable scanner

Post by ceeann1 » 25 Nov 2010, 23:25

I have gone a bit far afield of input on the best way to build a portable scanner... So I have moved this information to a new thread called, Origami Scanner- a folding book scanner. I have restated this information there. The following thread is from Daniel and it is about folding.
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Re: Input on the best way to build a portable scanner

Post by daniel_reetz » 27 Nov 2010, 12:40

These are some really great ideas in here, ceeann. I saw this GIF this morning and thought of all the folding scanner builders on this forum:
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Re: Input on the best way to build a portable scanner

Post by jck57 » 27 Nov 2010, 19:50

daniel_reetz wrote:These are some really great ideas in here, ceeann. I saw this GIF this morning and thought of all the folding scanner builders on this forum:
Be even better if the guy started out sitting on the chair to show it was functional and not a gag.

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Re: Input on the best way to build a portable scanner

Post by ceeann1 » 27 Nov 2010, 21:51

How very interesting. This reminds me of a folding table for camping. They where made of Steel sheet and Masonite at first and then updated to Aluminum and ABS plastic latter. They where a table that was the case. The case opened and the stools and legs of the table folded out. Much like the chair above. I will post a picture if I can find one.
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I believe the chair is righteous. It has stiffeners in the legs and the back is appropriate. The load limit would not be huge but it should work. I tried to find one but apparently they are not very popular in the states. It would be unlikely that they have not been seen here in the past. To many more designs being put out for chairs though.

As for applicabilitiy to a folding machine like that I am proposing... I think that there is much to be said about using similar functionality. The folding/ collapsing idea is similar in some ways to what I propose. I would like to use the idea of the suitcase/ cover being built in to the functional unit. I had in fact thought of the above pictured camping table. hmm.... It bears thinking upon some more in terms of the side supports and perhaps the top as well... Thanks for the input!

Lastly, building something to show it works is much like Scientific Method vs. Natural Philosophy , eventually one has to go there or one is never really sure. So eventually I. like the fellow with the chair, will have to use what I have conceived. Build what I have planned to show it works.

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Re: Input on the best way to build a portable scanner

Post by ceeann1 » 28 Nov 2010, 14:22

I would add the following link:
http://www.diybookscanner.org/forum/vie ... 31&start=0
which is,"Brainstorming about portable scanners." I think that it applies here to this thread and vice versa.

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Re: Input on the best way to build a portable scanner

Post by ceeann1 » 30 Nov 2010, 21:19

Moved to the Origami Scanner- a folding book scanner thread,

spamsickle is making a remark about the adjustability of the camera mounts on the origami scanner as I first posted it in the next post.
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Re: Input on the best way to build a portable scanner

Post by spamsickle » 30 Nov 2010, 21:28

I really like your drawings.

Unless you're planning to experiment with platens and cradles which offer angles other than 90 degrees, I'd say you don't need an angle adjustment on the cameras. They should be fixed at 45 degrees, and adjust up and down. If you start trying to fix the framing by adjusting camera angle, you're probably going to introduce keystoning which could have been avoided by having the camera angle fixed and framing the image by moving the camera up and down only and adjusting the zoom.

While keystoning is easily correctable in software, in my opinion it's better just to avoid it by not giving yourself freedom to adjust the cameras in ways you don't need.

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