Daniel Reetz, the founder of the DIY Book Scanner community, has recently started making videos of prototyping and shop tips. If you are tinkering with a book scanner (or any other project) in your home shop, these tips will come in handy. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCn0gq8 ... g_8K1nfInQ

Origami Scanner- a folding book scanner

Built a scanner? Started to build a scanner? Record your progress here. Doesn't need to be a whole scanner - triggers and other parts are fine. Commercial scanners are fine too.
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railman
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Re: Origami Scanner- a folding book scanner

Post by railman » 06 Jan 2011, 12:41

daniel_reetz wrote:Thanks, Railman.
Here's more info on this.
...This mobile copy stand was developed by Manfred Mayer an engineer and
conservator at the University Library Graz in Austria. It allows for efficient
digitization of rare and sensitive material (books and manuscripts) where careful
handling and book support is required. The TCCS was developed for digitization
of printed or manuscript material from collections in eastern and southeastern
Europe. Since these items could not leave the institution, it was necessary to
develop a mobile copy stand that would meet conservation standards. Most of
the digitization can be done with a point and shoot camera with a live view. Any
SLR camera can be used as well. Just remember, most SLR cameras do not
have a live view. Therefore, the camera will need to be connected to a monitor
to preview the picture to be taken.


Technical Data

· Dimensions approximately 30" x 17" x 28".
· The Traveller is suited for formats up to 16 ½" x 12 ½" x 4".
· The TCCS is collapsible and fits in a suitcase which measures approximately
32.5" x 22.5" x 13".
· The surface area needed to operate the Traveller is 31" x 47".
· Weight without camera: 25 pounds including LED lighting
· Shock resistant, high efficiency LED´s (Light Emitting Diodes) with a life span
of approximately 50.000 hours.
· Operation voltage: 110 – 240 Volts
· Power consumption: 30 Watts

Various cameras will work with the copy stand: i.e. Sony DCS-R1, Panasonic
Lumix DMC-FZ50, Nikon D1X and D40, Hasselblad H3D.
http://www.polistini.com/products/equip ... d-more.php
http://www.polistini.com/products/equip ... -stand.php

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ceeann1
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Re: Origami Scanner- a folding book scanner

Post by ceeann1 » 06 Jan 2011, 15:25

How interesting!!! Another folding scanner!!!

This one is cantilevered and looks to be more geared to delicate large documents and not so much for speed. I can see how it might be expanded to make it usable with two cameras... adding the other side light bar and camera mount and such. It would make the folding a bit different. The platen would be considerably different though.... hmm.... I will think about this a little Thanks Railman!!!

<edit>
25 lbs ... wow... Definatly in the lugable division!!! Wonder what the materials are... looks like square high carbon steel tube. Wonder if they would use chrome-moly? hmm....

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ceeann1
Posts: 106
Joined: 17 Nov 2010, 20:00
E-book readers owned: Several Palm PDA's
Number of books owned: 700
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Re: Origami Scanner- a folding book scanner

Post by ceeann1 » 21 Jan 2011, 15:28

Hi all,
I have been doodling and thinking about the folding scanner that was posted by Railman above for awhile now. Although there are several ideas floating around in my head they just do not have the ease of use for a platen that the standard builds that are already on the forum have built into them.

I really like the way the lighting works on this commercial scanner though. The cantilevered light rails are neat and they use them to get around glare in a different way than directly overhead. It seems a nice way to use LED lights. I just cant seem to get the scissoring lift to work for lighting without it getting in the way or getting increasingly complex. When I try to put the cantilevered lights on my own folder there are things in the way to cast shadows... sigh... I guess I am still thinking of how to use the insites from this folder into my own. It just may not work well.

I am still thinking about it though even now this post helped me get this unstuck in my mind and a couple of ideas popped up. Latters...

le.gentleman

Re: Origami Scanner- a folding book scanner

Post by le.gentleman » 22 May 2011, 21:51

Dear Ceeann1,

Did you complete your book scanner yet? I also want to build a book scanner for large books and magazines together with my father in law. Since many of the materials I am interested in are in different countries or just available at the library, I would really love to see what you came up with.

Best regards, le.gentleman

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