Daniel Reetz, the founder of the DIY Book Scanner community, has recently started making videos of prototyping and shop tips. If you are tinkering with a book scanner (or any other project) in your home shop, these tips will come in handy. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCn0gq8 ... g_8K1nfInQ

DIY Desktop CNC Machine

Built a scanner? Started to build a scanner? Record your progress here. Doesn't need to be a whole scanner - triggers and other parts are fine. Commercial scanners are fine too.
will1384

Re: DIY Desktop CNC Machine

Post by will1384 » 01 Jan 2011, 21:44

I ended up ordering the BluumaxCNC, its got a 12" x 17" working area, its a small, cheap
easy, and simple, Gantry CNC Router unit designed for stuff like wood and plastic, but no
metal, its basically a learning platform, something to get you started and help you learn about
CNC.

I intend to upgrade later in the year, or next, after some learning time, and saving up money,
I am looking at:

http://buildyourcnc.com/ - CNC routers made from "Medium Density Overlaid Plywood"
http://www.finelineautomation.com/ - CNC routers made from 8020 aluminum parts

I now have to clean out a place in my small work shop, and ether make or buy a work bench for
the Gantry CNC Router and the computer - and my work shop is stuffed like a turkey LOL

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rob
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Re: DIY Desktop CNC Machine

Post by rob » 01 Jan 2011, 22:04

Just FYI, there are CNC routers, and CNC mills. Be sure you know which one you want -- a CNC router is for big wooden things, and a CNC mill is for small metal things. I detail what I went through to build (sort of) my own CNC mill here.
The Singularity is Near. ~ http://halfbakedmaker.org ~ Follow me as I build the world's first all-mechanical steam-powered computer.

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Re: DIY Desktop CNC Machine

Post by ceeann1 » 06 Feb 2011, 15:45

Just a quick update from the FabLab thing, thought all y'all might want to know...
D.Wolfskehl is the main guy at the FabLab. This is his reply to me asking about memberships. I guess they are not ready. Somewhat disappointing but not unexpected as previously noted.


Daniel Wolfskehl January 26, 2011 at 11:08am
Re: Fab Lab
Hi,
Right at this moment, we are working mostly with High School students and taking on projects. We will most likely begin to work with the membership in the future, but not right now. You should stop by on Saturday if you would lilke to get a tour.
Sincertely,
Daniel
My #


I decided that more time spent on the FabLab was time poorly spent at this point. I did learn a bit about fast prototyping though and it is worth the time in the right setting. At the moment though I believe I would be able to reproduce one of the laster cut scanners faster with a scroll saw than by trying to rustle up a laser cutter in albuquerque. By the by I found out we are the 34th largest city in the states... interesting eh?

will1384

Re: DIY Desktop CNC Machine

Post by will1384 » 07 Feb 2011, 05:20

I got my CNC Router up and running, still needs some fine tuning and learning on
my part.

With Hardware, Software, bits, miscellaneous parts, and a Workbench, I may have spent
around $1300, the Software was almost the price of the CNC Router, and all the little things
add up quick LOL

I have a Picasa album of it over at

http://picasaweb.google.com/will1384/CN ... directlink
ceeann1 wrote: At the moment though I believe I would be able to reproduce one of the laster cut
scanners faster with a scroll saw than by trying to rustle up a laser cutter in albuquerque.
I am going to look over some of the book scanners and see what I can do on my CNC Router, I have
a small cutting area, but I should be able to work around it.

I have a scroll saw, and other wood working tools, but I never seem to be able to cut a straight line,
LOL even with a laser guided saw, one of the reasons I got the CNC Router, later on I plan to make
a panel saw, for plywood and MDF sheets.

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Re: DIY Desktop CNC Machine

Post by daniel_reetz » 07 Feb 2011, 11:50

Will1384, love the machine and your table design with the gaspipe - did you build that, too? Do you have plans online? Congrats on bringing your CNC machine to completion! I did that, but my machine is in a storage shed in Fargo. :/

will1384

Re: DIY Desktop CNC Machine

Post by will1384 » 08 Feb 2011, 02:08

daniel_reetz wrote:Will1384, love the machine and your table design with the gaspipe - did you build that, too? Do you have plans online? Congrats on bringing your CNC machine to completion! I did that, but my machine is in a storage shed in Fargo. :/
I needed table/workbench and most of the time I would have just used angle Iron. but with
the CNC router I wanted to be able to change and adjust the table, so I used black steel
pipe, I also wanted to save some money, and make more stuff from pipe later, so I got a pipe
threader, the cost of the table using plywood and 2x4 for a top, and pipe / pipe fittings for
legs was around $120 without the cost of the pipe threader.

I may put up plans later on, but I cut some of the pipe to lengths you can't buy pre-cut,
and to thread pipe you need a huge vise, something to cut the pipe, and a bench grinder
helps also, so it may not be to useful to most, the next workbench will be cut to normal
off the shelf sizes.

Tim

Re: DIY Desktop CNC Machine

Post by Tim » 08 Feb 2011, 10:42

Wow, very interesting thread. This just cost me many hours of looking at CNC machines and drooling. I had looked at the 3D printers before, but now I am fairly convinced that a similarly priced CNC machine can produce much higher quality results, just at the cost of a little less flexibility in the design. CNCs are subtractive processes, so any part of the desired result that can't be accessed from the top (or outside with a 4 axis rotating CNC) can't be done unless 2 or more molds are made, parts are joined, or similar.

I haven't seen anyone link it here, but a guy at this link http://lcamtuf.coredump.cx/guerrilla_cnc1.shtml shows how he makes parts for his robots using his CNC machine to make molds then cast with plastics and resins to get very high quality parts. He makes a good case for the CNC being very versatile, but also talks about what it can't do. There is extensive information about the physical qualities of the various resins and many links to various suppliers for everything from the machine to the the resins. Since his aim was very high quality he spent $30k+ on his CNC, but the experience and how-to information is very good.

will1384

Re: DIY Desktop CNC Machine

Post by will1384 » 08 Feb 2011, 12:56

Tim wrote:Wow, very interesting thread. This just cost me many hours of looking at CNC machines and drooling. I had looked at the 3D printers before, but now I am fairly convinced that a similarly priced CNC machine can produce much higher quality results, just at the cost of a little less flexibility in the design. CNCs are subtractive processes, so any part of the desired result that can't be accessed from the top (or outside with a 4 axis rotating CNC) can't be done unless 2 or more molds are made, parts are joined, or similar.

I haven't seen anyone link it here, but a guy at this link http://lcamtuf.coredump.cx/guerrilla_cnc1.shtml shows how he makes parts for his robots using his CNC machine to make molds then cast with plastics and resins to get very high quality parts. He makes a good case for the CNC being very versatile, but also talks about what it can't do. There is extensive information about the physical qualities of the various resins and many links to various suppliers for everything from the machine to the the resins. Since his aim was very high quality he spent $30k+ on his CNC, but the experience and how-to information is very good.
Good link, I looked threw the link, its like a book LOL, I got near the bottom and read about
"Noise considerations" the words "quiet" and "below 65 dB", -WOW- I wish my CNC router was
that quiet, mine sound like a dentist's drill times 1,000, I have it in a insulated workshop
about 30 feet from the house, and inside the house I can still hear the CNC router, even with
fans running and the TV on, its faint but I hear it, the Dremel 4000 is incredibly loud when
inside the workshop, I have to use ear protection.

After I posted this I went out and cut something with the CNC router, I measured 110 dB one inch
from the Dremel 4000, and 98 dB one foot away, on the back of the sound meter it lists 110 dB
as loudness of thunder.

Tim

Re: DIY Desktop CNC Machine

Post by Tim » 09 Feb 2011, 11:30

will1384 wrote: Good link, I looked threw the link, its like a book LOL, I got near the bottom and read about
"Noise considerations" the words "quiet" and "below 65 dB", -WOW- I wish my CNC router was
that quiet, mine sound like a dentist's drill times 1,000, I have it in a insulated workshop
about 30 feet from the house, and inside the house I can still hear the CNC router, even with
fans running and the TV on, its faint but I hear it, the Dremel 4000 is incredibly loud when
inside the workshop, I have to use ear protection.

After I posted this I went out and cut something with the CNC router, I measured 110 dB one inch
from the Dremel 4000, and 98 dB one foot away, on the back of the sound meter it lists 110 dB
as loudness of thunder.
Yeah, I think his 65 dB number was running but not cutting. He said something about that being
the way the manufacturers measure and report the loudness. 110 dB is crazy but not surprising.
Maybe building a cabinet to put the thing in would be worth it with some other soundproofing
methods. And what material are you cutting at that dB level?

I also forgot the guy had another electronics guide that may be more directly applicable to more
people's efforts here at DIY Book Scanner. It's link is:
http://lcamtuf.coredump.cx/electronics/

will1384

Re: DIY Desktop CNC Machine

Post by will1384 » 09 Feb 2011, 14:42

Tim wrote: Yeah, I think his 65 dB number was running but not cutting. He said something about that being
the way the manufacturers measure and report the loudness. 110 dB is crazy but not surprising.
Maybe building a cabinet to put the thing in would be worth it with some other soundproofing
methods. And what material are you cutting at that dB level?

I also forgot the guy had another electronics guide that may be more directly applicable to more
people's efforts here at DIY Book Scanner. It's link is:
http://lcamtuf.coredump.cx/electronics/
Sadly, the Dremel 4000 makes the same amount of noise cutting or not, its a constant 110 dB :(

There is a spindle motor from Zen Toolworks that's said to be quiet, I think I am going to try it,
I watched a few videos of a CNC Router cutting with one, and the stepper motors were louder
than the spindle motor, so its got to be pretty quiet.

I am also going to setup some kind of dust collection system, just the few things I have cut, have
made a huge mess LOL

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