Daniel Reetz, the founder of the DIY Book Scanner community, has recently started making videos of prototyping and shop tips. If you are tinkering with a book scanner (or any other project) in your home shop, these tips will come in handy. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCn0gq8 ... g_8K1nfInQ

University of Tokyo "page flip" scanner video

DIY Book Scanner Skunk Works. Share your crazy ideas and novel approaches. Home of the "3D structure of a book" thread.
benjamin
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University of Tokyo "page flip" scanner video

Post by benjamin » 17 Mar 2010, 15:11

Sure many of you have read about this technology, which uses a high speed camera and IR to resolve page distortion on the fly, so a book can be flipped and processed in minutes. Video's pretty rad.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tCOXC5PT ... r_embedded

cratylus
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Re: University of Tokyo "page flip" scanner video

Post by cratylus » 17 Mar 2010, 15:36

:shock:

A la "Short Circuit". The movie.

koulevprime
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Re: University of Tokyo "page flip" scanner video

Post by koulevprime » 17 Mar 2010, 21:11

Why do we have to be in the preparations of this stuff, when all of a sudden our buzz is killed in realization that Japan already has it.

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Re: University of Tokyo "page flip" scanner video

Post by rob » 17 Mar 2010, 22:41

Our buzz is definitely not killed. They use a 500 frames per second camera to grab the images so quickly. Hardly something that costs a few hundred dollars!
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Re: University of Tokyo "page flip" scanner video

Post by Afish » 18 Mar 2010, 02:24

It would be great if some of the concepts can be applied to DIY book scanners.

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Misty
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Re: University of Tokyo "page flip" scanner video

Post by Misty » 18 Mar 2010, 10:09

It's nice to see a video of this in English! I saw a video of the same scanner a few months ago when Jill Hurst-Wahl posted it at her Digitization 101 blog, but the narration was all in Japanese.

I wonder whether something like this would be feasible at a lower page-turning speed with an HD camcorder running at 60fps.
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Re: University of Tokyo "page flip" scanner video

Post by daniel_reetz » 18 Mar 2010, 11:03

The major issue with all HD camcorders is that they read out the sensor in rows from top to bottom, which takes time. This results in something called "rolling shutter artifacts" (youtube searches for this are fun). What it would mean here is that parts of the page would be captured twice or not at all as it rolled across the sensor.

Personally, I think structured light scanning, or barcode coding like Rob was playing with, offer some pretty compelling options. Google's scanning stations use some kind of structured light to get the job done. I have an idea and have been working on feasibility testing with Matti -- hope to announce some progress in a thread next month.

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Misty
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Re: University of Tokyo "page flip" scanner video

Post by Misty » 18 Mar 2010, 11:51

My understanding (from reading this article) is that rolling shutter is an artifact of CMOS sensors, and that CCD-based camcorders don't suffer from it. CMOS is certainly becoming a very popular HD camcorder sensor these days, however.

Rolling shutter effects can definitely be fun. I remember seeing some people using a similar effect on still cameras (kind of the digital equivalent of focal plane shutters) on cheap digital toy cameras cameras to get intentional distortions - I think it was a Yashica, or Agfa?
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Re: University of Tokyo "page flip" scanner video

Post by daniel_reetz » 18 Mar 2010, 13:00

There are also CMOS sensors with "global readout" that will work.

Not all CCDs are immune, but yeah, most HD and high res stuff these days is CMOS. I'm just saying, it probably won't work with off-the-shelf stuff, but that doesn't mean it can't be done or shouldn't be investigated. I love this kind of blue-sky thinking and think we ought to do more of it as a group. There are probably ways to eliminate a lot of the hardware difficulty.

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Re: University of Tokyo "page flip" scanner video

Post by StevePoling » 18 Mar 2010, 22:13

daniel_reetz wrote:Personally, I think structured light scanning, or barcode coding like Rob was playing with, offer some pretty compelling options. Google's scanning stations use some kind of structured light to get the job done. I have an idea and have been working on feasibility testing with Matti -- hope to announce some progress in a thread next month.
Dan, why the heck aren't you going for some kind of Engineering PhD? Why not convert all your psych credits to neural network stuff and research image understanding algorithms?

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