Daniel Reetz, the founder of the DIY Book Scanner community, has recently started making videos of prototyping and shop tips. If you are tinkering with a book scanner (or any other project) in your home shop, these tips will come in handy. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCn0gq8 ... g_8K1nfInQ

Hi all - paperback scanning

A place to introduce yourself, and to meet other awesome people.
Post Reply
mmastrac
Posts: 2
Joined: 25 May 2016, 11:56
Number of books owned: 150
Country: Canada

Hi all - paperback scanning

Post by mmastrac » 05 Jun 2016, 12:45

Hey all,

Great to meet you all. I'm a Canadian techie, interested in preservation of paperbacks.

I've been lurking without a user on these forums for a few months investigating approaches to scanning out-of-print paperbacks non-destructively (and without adding additional wear to the spine).

The laser approaches have been interesting, but I've actually gone as far as getting a custom quote for a 20cm x 20cm x 20cm 90º prism from China (~1500 USD if anyone is curious). I also approach a US manufacturer that stated it would be potentially 5 figures and would require ITAR paperwork (!). I've seen a few offhand mentions of prism techniques, but it doesn't appear that anyone has documented results from it.

Matt.

duerig
Posts: 358
Joined: 01 Jun 2014, 17:04
Number of books owned: 1000
Country: United States of America

Re: Hi all - paperback scanning

Post by duerig » 09 Jun 2016, 10:45

Hi. I'm not actually sure what the prism technique is. I've seen some videos of commercial scanners with a prism in the bottom. But this seems to be using the prism as a kind of dual lens that lets the sensor scan both pages at a time. A vacuum keeps the pages pulled against the prism as it moves. Is this what you planned on replicating? Or is there another way to use a prism I don't know about?

Regarding the laser scanning stuff, the dewarping software works and I have a prototype on my pack porch. When I have time, I want to polish it up and maybe turn it into a kit. In the mean time, if you want to make a laser scanner for yourself, feel free to PM me or email me at duerig at tenrec dot builders and I can walk you through what to do. I am certain that you could build a laser scanner for less than the cost of your prism. Lasers are cheap. :-)

-D

mmastrac
Posts: 2
Joined: 25 May 2016, 11:56
Number of books owned: 150
Country: Canada

Re: Hi all - paperback scanning

Post by mmastrac » 12 Jun 2016, 16:58

Since lots of the paperbacks are perfect bound, I'm concerned that opening them much further than 45º will cause excessive spine creasing.

In my case I'm thinking of pushing the prism into the book so the pages never have to open more than 45º. The prism would be reflective on the hypotenuse, making it almost like a "periscope" into the book. I've seen a small prototype of this here: http://www.factum-arte.com/pag/699/The- ... ok-Scanner.

Image

I'd definitely be tempted to build a laser rig over this, although having a giant 90º prism on my desk would be sweet. :D I'll ping you off the forum for more info on the laser approach.

wmalcolmk
Posts: 24
Joined: 12 May 2015, 04:39
Number of books owned: 500
Country: England

Re: Hi all - paperback scanning

Post by wmalcolmk » 14 Jun 2016, 05:18

Why not use a mirror and a sheet of glass?
These can be bought from any hardware store.
If you look at my Footsie scanner thread, I assemble two sheets of glass between end cheeks. This produces a very rigid structure. It would be much lighter and cheaper than a prism.
Malcolm

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest