Daniel Reetz, the founder of the DIY Book Scanner community, has recently started making videos of prototyping and shop tips. If you are tinkering with a book scanner (or any other project) in your home shop, these tips will come in handy. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCn0gq8 ... g_8K1nfInQ

Creating a Digital Library

Book scanning methods that involve taking books apart.
John_Latta
Posts: 10
Joined: 25 Sep 2013, 16:54
E-book readers owned: iPad
Number of books owned: 10000
Country: US

Re: Creating a Digital Library

Post by John_Latta » 21 Jun 2020, 22:49

Good points have been raised.

Preserving these books for posterity is not my objective. Most books have a short useful life. Thus, if my great grandchildren found them they would likely be uninterested. However, I have created archives of family history including photos – nearly 500GB - on USB drives. Daniel is spot on – make many copies and give them to all potentially interested parties. That is one of the safest means of preservation but there is no need to do this for my digital library.

The current bookshelf has 3,502 books which requires only 1.42TB, thus, the amount of space is relatively small. All of this can fit on the SSD on the Lenovo Yoga C940 which is one of the book readers. The Active Directory Network here has 200TB of RAID 6 storage which has many backup copies of the library. These backups are available to every computer on the network but very seldom needed. Selectively books are also downloaded to an iPhone for reading.

Cloud storage is not used. Too expensive, too slow and inconsistent with the constantly changing library. Keep it local and protect it extensively – is my mantra.

John_Latta
Posts: 10
Joined: 25 Sep 2013, 16:54
E-book readers owned: iPad
Number of books owned: 10000
Country: US

Re: Creating a Digital Library

Post by John_Latta » 24 Jun 2020, 08:32

Changed on Cloud Storage

For other reasons I had a motivation to evaluate Cloud storage. My experiences with the various services has been mixed; a key reason being the subscription charges. pCloud offers 2TB for a fixed fee of $350. Another factor is it is fast. There are apps for smart phones.

Books in the digital library are large – typically 100MB or larger some as large at 3GB. I want large files to retain high photo quality and the higher page resolution implies better OCR quality.

One book was deposited on pCloud; 847MB. It took a while to download to the iPhone using the pCloud app but the reading experience within the app was excellent.

This capability allows me to put books of current interest on the iPhone. The experience is very similar to the ebook offerings, but this is MY digital library.

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daniel_reetz
Posts: 2797
Joined: 03 Jun 2009, 13:56
E-book readers owned: Used to have a PRS-500
Number of books owned: 600
Country: United States
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Re: Creating a Digital Library

Post by daniel_reetz » 24 Jun 2020, 23:42

Right. Very interesting, John. At the end of the day "The Cloud" just means "somebody else's computer". I don't trust the cloud at all. Companies and services come and go. And who knows what happens to all those computers that somebody else once owned?

In the olden days, when I was young ;) we ran our own severs and had our own files on them. And I think for a personal library this is a great idea. When I worked at the Internet Archive, they were testing the idea of a digital locker. That you could have your own library there, for yourself and only you, but using their reader. I loved this idea, but have no idea where it ended up.

One principle:
Just like the personal scanners, personal libraries need to serve their users.

Another principle:
What might seem worthless to you could be gold to others, and vice versa. Archiving would be super-tractable if each book only needed to be scanned once, instead of being scanned per-user.

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